Review

The discovery of holographic interferometry, its development and applications
Karl A. Stetson
Published Published online: 16 June 2022 , doi: 10.37188/lam.2022.002
This paper recounts the discovery of holographic interferometry, discusses its development, and itemizes some of its major applications.
The state-of-the-art in computer generated holography for 3D display
David Blinder, Tobias Birnbaum, Tomoyoshi Ito, Tomoyoshi Shimobaba
Published Published online: 10 June 2022 , doi: 10.37188/lam.2022.035
Holographic displays have the promise to be the ultimate 3D display technology, able to account for all visual cues. Recent advances in photonics and electronics gave rise to high-resolution holographic display prototypes, indicating that they may become widely available in the near future. One major challenge in driving those display systems is computational: computer generated holography (CGH) consists of numerically simulating diffraction, which is very computationally intensive. Our goal in this paper is to give a broad overview of the state-of-the-art in CGH. We make a classification of modern CGH algorithms, we describe different algorithmic CGH acceleration techniques, discuss the latest dedicated hardware solutions and indicate how to evaluate the perceptual quality of CGH. We summarize our findings, discuss remaining challenges and make projections on the future of CGH.
Holography with high-power CW coherent terahertz source: optical components, imaging, and applications
Yulia Choporova, Boris Knyazev, Vladimir Pavelyev
Published Published online: 09 June 2022 , doi: 10.37188/lam.2022.031
This paper presents the results of 15 years of studies in the field of terahertz holography at the Novosibirsk free electron laser. They cover two areas: research on obtaining holographic images in the terahertz range and the use of diffractive optical elements to form high-power terahertz radiation fields with specified characteristics (intensity, phase, and polarization), using well-studied and widely applied in the optical range methods of optical (analog), digital, and computer-generated holography. All experiments were performed with the application of high-power coherent monochromatic frequency-tunable radiation from the Novosibirsk free electron laser. The features of hologram registration in the terahertz range are described. Methods, technologies, and optical materials for terahertz holographic elements are discussed. A wide range of promising applications of high-power terahertz fields with a given spatial structure is considered. The results of the study of terahertz holograms recorded as digital holograms, as well as radiation-resistive optical elements realized as computer-synthesized holograms, are presented.
Phase microscopy and surface profilometry by digital holography
Myung K. Kim
Published Published online: 06 May 2022 , doi: 10.37188/lam.2022.019
Quantitative phase microscopy by digital holography is a good candidate for high-speed, high precision profilometry. Multi-wavelength optical phase unwrapping avoids difficulties of numerical unwrapping methods, and can generate surface topographic images with large axial range and high axial resolution. But the large axial range is accompanied by proportionately large noise. An iterative process utilizing holograms acquired with a series of wavelengths is shown to be effective in reducing the noise to a few micrometers even over the axial range of several millimeters. An alternate approach with shifting of illumination angle, instead of using multiple laser sources, provides multiple effective wavelengths from a single laser, greatly simplifying the system complexity and providing great flexibility in the wavelength selection. Experiments are performed demonstrating the basic processes of multi-wavelength digital holography (MWDH) and multi-angle digital holography (MADH). Example images are presented for surface profiles of various types of surface structures. The methods have potential for versatile, high performance surface profilometry, with compact optical system and straightforward processing algorithms.
Advanced optical methods and materials for fabricating 3D tissue scaffolds
Xiaobo Li, Wanping Lu, Xiayi Xu, Yintao Wang, Shih-Chi Chen
Published Published online: 06 May 2022 , doi: 10.37188/lam.2022.026
Three-dimensional (3D) printing, also known as additive manufacturing (AM), has undergone a phase of rapid development in the fabrication of customizable and high-precision parts. Thanks to the advancements in 3D printing technologies, it is now a reality to print cells, growth factors, and various biocompatible materials altogether into arbitrarily complex 3D scaffolds with high degree of structural and functional similarities to the native tissue environment. Additionally, with overpowering advantages in molding efficiency, resolution, and a wide selection of applicable materials, optical 3D printing methods have undoubtedly become the most suitable approach for scaffold fabrication in tissue engineering (TE). In this paper, we first provide a comprehensive and up-to-date review of current optical 3D printing methods for scaffold fabrication, including traditional extrusion-based processes, selective laser sintering, stereolithography, and two-photon polymerization etc. Specifically, we review the optical design, materials, and representative applications, followed by fabrication performance comparison. Important metrics include fabrication precision, rate, materials, and application scenarios. Finally, we summarize and compare the advantages and disadvantages of each technique to guide readers in the optics and TE communities to select the most fitting printing approach under different application scenarios.
Holographic 3D Imaging through Random Media: Methodologies and Challenges
Mitsuo Takeda, Wolfgang Osten, Eriko Watanabe
Published Published online: 01 May 2022 , doi: 10.37188/lam.2022.014
Imaging through random media continues to be a challenging problem of crucial importance in a wide range of fields of science and technology, ranging from telescopic imaging through atmospheric turbulence in astronomy to microscopic imaging through scattering tissues in biology. To meet the scope of this anniversary issue in holography, this review places a special focus on holographic techniques and their unique functionality, which play a pivotal role in imaging through random media. This review comprises two parts. The first part is intended to be a mini tutorial in which we first identify the true nature of the problems encountered in imaging through random media. We then explain through a methodological analysis how unique functions of holography can be exploited to provide practical solutions to problems. The second part introduces specific examples of experimental implementations for different principles of holographic techniques, along with their performance results, which were taken from some of our recent work.
Review of engineering techniques in chaotic coded aperture imagers
Vijayakumar Anand, Joseph Rosen, Saulius Juodkazis
Published Published online: 01 May 2022 , doi: 10.37188/lam.2022.024
Coded aperture imaging (CAI) is a technique to image three-dimensional scenes with special controlled abilities. In this review, we survey several recently proposed techniques to control the parameters of CAI by engineering the aperture of the system. The prime architectures of these indirect methods of imaging are reviewed. For each design, we mention the relevant application of the CAI recorders and summarize this overview with a general perspective on this research topic.
Holography in the invisible. From the thermal infrared to the terahertz waves: outstanding applications and fundamental limits
Marc Georges, Yuchen Zhao, Jean-François Vandenrijt
Published Published online: 11 April 2022 , doi: 10.37188/lam.2022.022
Since its invention, holography has been mostly applied at visible wavelengths in a variety of applications. Specifically, non-destructive testing of manufactured objects was a driver for developing holographic methods and all related ones based on the speckle pattern recording. One substantial limitation of holographic non-destructive testing is the setup stability requirements directly related to the laser wavelength. This observation has driven some works for 15 years: developing holography at wavelengths much longer than visible ones. In this paper, we will first review researches carried out in the infrared, mostly digital holography at thermal infrared wavelengths around 10 micrometers. We will discuss the advantages of using such wavelengths and show different examples of applications. In nondestructive testing, large wavelengths allow using digital holography in perturbed environments on large objects and measure large deformations, typical of the aerospace domain. Other astonishing applications such as reconstructing scenes through smoke and flames were proposed. When moving further in the spectrum, digital holography with so-called Terahertz waves (up to 3 millimeters wavelength) has also been studied. The main advantage here is that these waves easily penetrate some materials. Therefore, one can envisage Terahertz digital holography to reconstruct the amplitude and phase of visually opaque objects. We review some cases in which Terahertz digital holography has shown potential in biomedical and industrial applications. We will also address some fundamental bottlenecks that prevent fully benefiting from the advantages of digital holography when increasing the wavelength.
A review of the dual-wavelength technique for phase imaging and 3D topography
Haowen Zhou, Mallik M. R. Hussain, Partha P. Banerjee
Published Published online: 02 April 2022 , doi: 10.37188/lam.2022.017
Optically transmissive and reflective objects may have varying surface profiles, which translate to arbitrary phase profiles for light either transmitted through or reflected from the object. For high-throughput applications, resolving arbitrary phases and absolute heights is a key problem. To extend the ability of measuring absolute phase jumps in existing 3D imaging techniques, the dual-wavelength concept, proposed in late 1800s, has been developed in the last few decades. By adopting an extra wavelength in measurements, a synthetic wavelength, usually larger than each of the single wavelengths, can be simulated to extract large phases or height variations from micron-level to tens of centimeters scale. We review a brief history of the developments in the dual-wavelength technique and present the methodology of this technique for using the phase difference and/or the phase sum. Various applications of the dual-wavelength technique are discussed, including height feature extraction from micron scale to centimeter scale in holography and interferometry, single-shot dual-wavelength digital holography for high-speed imaging, nanometer height resolution with fringe subdivision method, and applications in other novel phase imaging techniques and optical modalities. The noise sources for dual-wavelength techniques for phase imaging and 3D topography are discussed, and potential ways to reduce or remove the noise are mentioned.
Contributions of holography to the advancement of interferometric measurements of surface topography
Peter J. de Groot, Leslie L. Deck, Rong Su, Wolfgang Osten
Published Published online: 02 April 2022 , doi: 10.37188/lam.2022.007
Two major fields of study in optics—holography and interferometry—have developed at times independently and at other times together. The two methods share the principle of holistically recording as an intensity pattern the magnitude and phase distribution of a light wave, but they can differ significantly in how these recordings are formed and interpreted. Here we review seven specific developments, ranging from data acquisition to fundamental imaging theory in three dimensions, that illustrate the synergistic developments of holography and interferometry. A clear trend emerges, of increasing reliance of these two fields on a common trajectory of enhancements and improvements.
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